Modern Aesthetics | Coming and Going
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ASAPS 2018 Stats: Injectables, Other Non-Surgical Cosmetic Procedures Still Gain…
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Coming and Going

Coming

SUPER HERO JAW LINES

Finely chiseled jawlines—once only seen on super heroes and Brad Pitt—are the latest must-have feature for men…and women. Our new obsession with slim, trim jawlines is yet another thing to blame on social media and selfie scrutiny. But advances in minimally invasive techniques and technologies are certainly helping to fuel this trend. Jawlines that were once only achieved with genetics or surgery can now be crafted non-invasively thanks to the use of neuromodulators in the masseter muscles or designer fillers to lift the cheek and lower face and enhance the jawline (at both the angle of the jaw as well as the chin). Men often benefit from a stronger angle of the jawline, which can easily be enhanced with quick filler injection or new fat grafting techniques. Filler placement in the pre-jowl area can camouflage the early signs of facial aging in women and men. What’s more, other non-invasive modalities such as Coolsculpting to the submandibular area and/or Kybella injections can also enhance the profile. A sharper jawline can make a big difference in appearance, and I predict these procedures will get even hotter in the months and years to come.


Going

KEEPING PLASTIC SURGERY A SECRET

It used to be that looking “done” was a sign of affluence and high social standing. Why have plastic surgery if others didn’t know that you could afford it? But times are changing. More than three quarters of plastic surgeons surveyed said that their patients are seeking a more natural look instead of that tell-tale sculpted one, according to new data from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). While they may not want to look like they have their plastic surgeon’s number on speed dial, today’s patients are willing to tell you all about it (and by you, I mean everyone). Two-thirds of doctors (67 percent) say their patients are “owning it”—maybe because it’s the only way others will know they had (and can afford) cosmetic surgery. But more likely this attitude shift is due to a growing acceptance of our specialty, skill set, and what we can bring to the table.